Domestic abuse victims could get paid leave

Domestic abuse victims could get paid leave from work under Government scheme to crack down on the crime

  • Victims of domestic abuse could get paid leave under a Government crackdown
  • This would help them maintain economic independence while escaping partners
  • The regulations would allow victims to seek professional help, move house, etc.  

Victims of domestic abuse could be entitled to paid leave under a Government crackdown on the crime.

The measure would help employees keep their jobs and maintain economic independence while escaping violent partners.

The proposed regulations would give victims time to seek professional help, attend police or court appointments, move house and support their children.

The proposed regulations would give victims time to seek professional help, attend police or court appointments, move house and support their children. Pictured: Stock photo of a woman upset 

The proposal is part of a ministerial review of employment rights looking at what more could be done to support domestic abuse victims at work. 

Nicole Jacobs, the independent Domestic Abuse Commissioner, said: ‘When done effectively and sensitively, employers can play a pivotal role in supporting survivors to rebuild their lives.’

The Domestic Abuse Bill will introduce a new statutory definition of domestic abuse which, for the first time, includes a reference to ‘economic’ abuse – where abusers deny their partners access to food, money, clothes and transport.  

One in five victims take time off work due to abuse – risking them becoming even more dependent for money on their tormentors.

Research shows that 30 per cent of women – about five million – and 16 per cent of men, or 2.5million, experience domestic abuse during their lives.

One in five victims take time off work due to abuse – risking them becoming even more dependent for money on their tormentors. Pictured: Stock photo of man nervous at the office

Business Minister Paul Scully launched the review as flagship legislation which seeks to clamp down on the scourge progresses through Parliament.

He said: ‘Domestic abuse may occur in the home, but its impact stretches into every aspect of survivors’ lives.

‘This review aims to give employers the confidence and knowledge to support workers affected by domestic abuse.’

Safeguarding Minister Victoria Atkins said: ‘Domestic abuse is an abhorrent crime which often strips victims of their independence and denies them the opportunity to succeed and thrive.’

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